Showing posts with label Copperbelt. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Copperbelt. Show all posts

Thursday, 24 November 2016

How The City Of Ndola Got Its Name

A view of the Ndola Central Business District
By Paul Shalala in Ndola

Ndola is the second largest city in Zambia.

It is a sprawling metropolis which hosts some of the country’s most important industries.

Indeni, Zambia’s only oil refinery and a number of cement plants are within Ndola.

The city is only second to Lusaka in terms of high-rise buildings.

It is NOT only a major transit hub on the Copperbelt, but also the administrative centre for the province.

Ndola is also a terminus for travelers from the Democratic Republic of Congo and for onward traffic to the southern part of the country.

In Ndola, residents fondly call themselves ba ZimaNdola.

JK, one of Zambia’s most celebrated musicians even sung in one of his songs describing how he grew up in the town and calling its residents ba ZimaNdola.

But what does the name Ndola mean?

“All I know about Ndola is that it’s a name. I came here over 10 years ago but I don’t know what it means,” said Chanda, a cleaner.
Part of Kafubu river in Ndola's Twapia area

Most residents do not know where the name Ndola comes from.

Others even create false stories about it.

“Ndola is a name of a woman who used to live here. I heard this story from a friend,” said John Chileshe, a minibus driver who operates on the Itawa route.

To get to the bottom of the origin of the name Ndola, we need to dig into history.

The Copperbelt Province, where Ndola is located,  was originally inhabited by the Lamba speaking people.

Where Ndola is located, the first inhabitants were the Lambas who were led by Senior Chief Chiwala the first who reigned in the 17th century.

The traditional leader is believed to have migrated with his people from present day Tanzania and settled in the area where Rekays is.

Senior Chief Chiwala
According to the current Senior Chief Chiwala, who is the eighth person to hold the throne, Ndola was named after a stream called Ka Ndola which originally starts from the Kaloko Hills and flows through present day Mine Masala, Kabushi and drains its water into the Kafubu River.

The traditional leader says when his fore fathers were alive, the stream was a life line for the people and it was a revenue earner.

But a check at the site has reveled that houses have been built across the stream, gardens have been set up and the stream has almost disappeared.

“It is a pity that this stream has dried up due to human habitation. When our ancestors first settled here, the Ka Ndola stream provided them with fish and animals which feed in water,” said Senior Chief Chiwala as he took this blogger on a tour of the former stream.

Only a few portions of the Ka Ndola stream have remained.

Children find pleasure in the little flowing water remaining and they also catch crabs which they take home to eat.

“We usually catch these crabs and take them home for food. They are nutritious,” said Mulenga, an 11 year old boy from Kabushi who was found swinning.

Meanwhile, Senior Chief Chiwala says a number of residential areas such as Itawa, Kansenshi and Minsundu have historical significance to Lamba culture.
A street in Ndola a hundred years ago

“What you call Kanshenshi today comes from a Lamba word called akansenji which means beavers. We used to have beavers along the Ka Ndola stream. The residential area Itawa comes from the word Itabwa, that’s the name for us the Lambas under Senior Chief Chiwala.”

The traditional leader went on to reveal several other unknown stories about other aspects of Ndola city.

But as the Ka Ndola stream keeps disappearing due to increase in population and human habitation, authorities need to quickly protect it and help preserve the city’s history.

The stream (or the few portions remaining) deserves to be declared a national heritage site as it holds the history of Zambia’s second largest city. 

Monday, 9 May 2016

Copperbelt To Have First Ever Livestock Laboratory

By Paul Shalala in Luanshya
Cattle grazing in the Copperbelt town of Chililabombwe


Construction of the K4.5 million veterinary laboratory at Baluba in Luanshya have advanced.

Marks Industries Limited is constructing the two story building which will be helpful in fighting animal diseases on the Copperbelt.

It is a project which is part of the diversification process from mining to other industries on the Copperbelt.

For decades, Copperbelt province has relied on mining but slowly, agriculture is becoming the second industry in the area.

The construction of this multi-million state of the art veterinary laboratory will also be the first of its kind in the province.

For an area, with an extractive history of minerals, agriculture and animal husbandry seems to be taking root.

This laboratory in Baluba is expected to help authorities in combating animal diseases.

The structure is expected to have latest equipment using hitech gadgets to fight diseases which have ravaged the country.

The technology in this laboratory will be one of the best in the country.

So far, the ground floor is almost complete and works on the first floor are expected to start next week.

"We have done a lot of work and we are on course. Next week we will be pouring concrete on the second floor,” said Marks Industries Project Manager Brown Banda.

However, those in authority have their worries.

“This project has taken too long. Let me use this opportunity to ask the contractor to expedite the works. We want the laboratory to start working as soon as possible,” said Copperbelt Province Permanent Secretary Reverend Howard Sikwela.

But the contractor is optimistic that works are on course.

“We are hopeful that by October this year, we can finish all the works and hand over this laboratory to government,” said Marks Industries Public Relations Officer Fabian Mutale.

Currently, livestock farmers on the Copperbelt send samples of their animals to Lusaka for tests.

This is because the technology used to detect diseases and treat animals is not yet in the province.

But all that will be in the past, with the completion of this laboratory.

"Am happy with this project and i hope it can finish soon so that we can protect our animals from diseases," said John Tonga, a farmer in Mufulira who has been keeping livestock for over six years.

Sunday, 26 July 2015

Zambia Needs 150,000 Units Of Donated Blood Per Year


By Paul Shalala
Dr. Joseph Mulenga (right)


The Zambia National Blood Transmission Service (ZNBTS) says it needs 150, 000 units of blood per year to sufficiently cater for Zambia’s growing blood needs.

ZNBTS Director  Dr. Joseph Mulenga says the country only manages to donate 100, 000 units of blood with a deficit of f50, 000 units.

Dr Mulenga says there is need for more Zambians to come forward and donate blood which can save more lives in hospitals.

"Blood saves thousands of people. But we need to donate more so that we can save more women and children who need life," said Dr Mulenga during the rescheduled 2015 World Blood Donor Day which was held in Kitwe today under the theme: Thank You For Saving My Life.

He also dispelled assertions that donated blood is used for satanism.

"Many people accuse us of satanism. They say we collect blood for satanism. Ok here iam, am the chief satanism if you like. But our job is purely to save lives, nothing like satanism," he added, amid laughter from the audience.

And Kitwe District Commissioner Chanda Kabwe says donating blood is a national duty which citizens must be happy of.
Inside a blood bank


Mr Kabwe, who officiated at the event held at Lechwe School, says Zambians must take keen interest in blood donation because the activity saves thousands of mothers and children.

"Zambia is a christian nation, we should uphold life. Lets give blood and save more lives. By giving, we are showing love to one another.

Meanwhile, a recipient of donated blood recounted how she almost died due to lack of blood in her body.

"I was in labour and i was at the point of dying. But because of donated blood, my life was saved. So lets keep giving blood," said Sibo Mwala. 

A number of committed blood donors were honoured by the ZNBTS during the event.
Prominent among them was Akolwa Lishomwa who holds the record for the highest blood donor on the Copperbelt.

The 23 years old has donated blood 56 times over the past 16 years.

Among pupils, who are the largest donors to Zambia’s Blood Bank, Jane Manjabila of Chifubu Secondary school in Ndola was honoured for the highest blood donor among pupils on the Copperbelt.

Jane has donated 10 times.

The Blood Bank at the Kitwe Central Hospital is the reservoir for donated blood for the whole of the Copperbelt Province.
Donated blood


About 30,000 units of blood are donated by Copperbelt residents making this region the second largest blood donating region in Zambia after Lusaka Province.

Of all the blood donated in Zambia, 40% is used by children under the age of 5, another 40% is used by people with different health complications while the remaining 20% is used by pregnant women.

Thursday, 29 January 2015

Profile Of Edgar Chagwa Lungu: Zambia's 6th President




By Kasuba Mulenga

 His humble beginnings from House No. 4001 in Kitwe’s Chimwemwe township are perhaps what have shaped his belief that humility with firmness and decisiveness can take anyone anywhere. 

A stint as a trained military officer at what was then called Miltez in Kabwe has conceivably further molded his unpretentiousness up to the time of entering the political arena.

And it is possibly the rare mix of law and military discipline that nippily set the man in Edgar Chagwa Lungu on a political path that has now seen him elected Zambia’s sixth President in a poll contested by 10 other politicians.
According to ‘Meet Edgar C. Lungu’, a publication by Inzy Media, those who knew him in his university days as a tall easy going bloke say he was always out for action and innovation, including thinking outside the box.
This probably explains why the lawyer in Mr Lungu, while at Miltez, underwent grueling physical and mental training with such personalities as Zambia’s Deputy Ambassador to the United States Joe Chilaizya and other distinguished military officers who are now generals in the Zambia Army.

WHO IS EDGAR CHAGWA LUNGU?
An officer, lawyer, gentleman and politician who was born on November 11, 1956 at Ndola Central Hospital on the Copperbelt, he is married to Esther with whom he has six children.
Mr Lungu did his high school at Mukuba Secondary School before enrolling at the University of Zambia where he studied law and graduated as one of the best law students on October 17, 1981.
He went to the Zambia Institute of Advanced Legal Education (ZIALE) and in 1983 bagged his legal practicing certificate at the first crack.
It is worthwhile to state that Mr Lungu only completed his ZIALE course in 1983 because he had some work stints as a lawyer at the Ministry of Justice, Zambia Consolidated Copper Mines (ZCCM) and Barclays Bank Zambia Limited, among others, before he eventually obtained a law practicing certificate.
Many lawyers have to sit for a law practice certificate examination a dozen times before they get the certificate because it is not a walk-over assessment.
Mr Lungu is an accomplished lawyer who worked for Andre Masiye and Company in Lusaka before he felt that the court room was not big enough to change people’s lives.
He briefly joined the United Party for National Development  and later bid farewell and went to the then little known PF. In 2001, he stood as Chawama member of Parliament but lost. He remained in the PF Central Committee and in 2011, contested the Chawama seat and won, this time around.
It is Mr Lungu whom late President Michael Sata in some recorded ‘Let the People Talk’ dialogues on Radio Phoenix was often quoted as saying, “thank you to one of my lawyers, Edgar Lungu, and all well-wishers…”
And maybe there is a natural dynamic that often links lawyers to politics that gelled Mr Lungu to the current career path just as studies in other parts of the world show regarding the relationship between lawyers and politicians.
Studies show that in many democracies like Zambia, it is often lawyers who inundate the political platform. This is largely due to the fact that the law deals with the same sort of interrogations and predicaments as politics constantly does.
Lawyers like Mr Lungu often have to deal with what makes a ‘just society’; the balance between liberty and security.
Another study linking lawyers like President Lungu to power says legal practitioners make natural leaders because of their “obsession process and a tendency to see things hugely in none partisan terms- ‘us or them’ and ‘guilty or not guilty’- but nonetheless always in the spirit of loyalty to a cause that is rare in other professions.
It is perhaps the lawyer in Mr Lungu that saw him stop a sizzling soccer political ordeal when the Football Association of Zambia chided the TP Mazembe trio of Rainford Kalaba, Nathan Sinkala and Stopila Sunzu last year an immigration row that seemingly went out of hand.
The players’ passports had apparently been withheld by the Immigration Department because they had left the country without immigration clearance.
But as Minister of Home Affairs, Mr Lungu ordered the release of the players’ travel documents.
“Just a couple of months ago, these boys united the country and put Zambia on the world map as a great footballing nation. Yet today, someone wants to treat them like criminals…I don’t think it’s right. Give them back their passports, these boys are heroes,” Mr Lungu directed.
As a man with a heart for the helpless, Mr Lungu assisted 30 families of the April 1993 Gabon air disaster victims to recover K16 million (then K16 billion) as compensation from government for the loss of their loved ones.
The case dragged in court for about 11 years until Mr Lungu and fellow lawyer Sakwiba Sikota used their own resources to represent the bereaved families so that they could be compensated.
One-time profiler of President Lungu, Mr Anthony Mukwita, the former Zambia Daily Mail managing director, described the Head of State as “a man of deep rooted intellect, justice and above all sense of loyalty to friends and family.”
He said Zambians backed the right candidate in the January 20 presidential election.

THE RISE OF MR LUNGU
It is common knowledge that Mr Lungu started off at the back of the line in September 2011 after President Sata made history by unseating a serving government.
Within a year under what some analysts have called the fastest rise in office, Mr Sata appointed Mr Lungu as minister of Home Affairs, at a seemingly crucial time when the PF was experiencing intra-party spats.
In less than a year, President Sata again made Mr Lungu minister of Defence, in charge of the armed forces, protecting the territorial sovereignty of the country.
Despite these tasks, Mr Lungu continued his daily routine of going home from the office and later retreating to his constituency, Chawama, where he did everything ranging from settling marital disputes to personal differences among constituents when he was not spearheading construction of road projects, health posts or police post.
One day, a few days before Christmas, a journalist called Mr Lungu and asked him to describe the year 2013 politically.
“A day in a politician’s life is too long…I cannot completely sum up 2013 today before the year ends because we don’t just know, as politicians, what happens the next day.”
When making this statement, Mr Lungu had no slightest idea that he would be minister of defence the following day.
“It is a remarkable honour for me. I feel humbled by the magnitude of the responsibility bestowed upon me to serve the people of Zambia…I am equal to the task,” he said in accepting President Sata’s appointment.
In what seemed the quest to test his leadership potentials, President Sata asked Mr Lungu to stand in for him while he would be away in China to meet that country’s new leader Xi Jinping, a feat that was made repeatedly in a clear show of confidence in Mr Lungu.
Later, Mr Lungu was given additional responsibilities when he became minister of Justice and PF secretary general on top of his defence ministerial position.
Perhaps, it was this weighty load of tasks piled on him which made the general PF membership, and particularly Members of the Central Committee, to believe he could be heir to President Sata when news of the demise of Mr Sata in a London hospital reached government on October 28, 2014.
As is normally the case in political circles, just like in homes, intra PF tiffs took centre stage in the run-up-to the election of the ruling party leader, and eventually candidate in the January 20 presidential poll.
But at the end of the day, the die was cast, and Mr Lungu contested the race for presidency of the country in which he emerged victor.
“Fifty-eight years ago, I was born Edgar Chagwa Lungu at Ndola Central Hospital and grew up in Kitwe’s Chimwemwe township.
“As I stand before you today, as the sixth President of the Great Republic of Zambia, I am overwhelmed with gratitude, and I feel greatly humbled that you have decided to make me your servant – you are my masters, I am your servant,” Mr Lungu said in his inaugural speech amid deafening ovations by the people at the momentous ceremony held at National Heroes Stadium in Lusaka last Sunday.
In an apparent show of commitment to delivering service to the people, Mr Lungu has already started working, and has so far appointed some members of his Cabinet and State House staff.
Perhaps what is most intriguing about the happenings since he assumed office is the selection of former minister of Gender and Child Development Inonge Wina as the first ever Zambia’s female Vice-President.
This action has earned President Lungu continued approbations from the breadth and length of the country.
This story was originally published by the Zambia Daily Mail on 29 January, 2015

Friday, 29 June 2012

Three people die in separate road accidents


The Zambia Police Service has confirmed the death of three people in separate road accidents which happened in Western, Eastern and Copperbelt Provinces on 27 June, 2012.

In Eastern Province, a driver of a motor vehicle Nissan Hard Body registration number ABV 3359 died on the spot leaving the two passengers with serious injuries while one passenger escaped unhurt when the vehicle he was driving overturned 20 kilometers east of Nyimba  Boma on Great North East Road around 1700 hours.

The deceased has been identified as Rabson Tembo aged 58, of bauleni Compound, Lusaka and he was driving from Lusaka to Chipata.

The accident happened when the driver of the motor vehicle hit into a pot hole hence losing control of the motor vehicle and over turned.

The body of the deceased is lying in Nyimba District Hospital Mortuary awaiting postmortem while the injured are admitted at the same Hospital.

In Western Province, a cyclist died on the spot after he was hit by a Higher Bus registration number ALD 2488 belonging to Red Bomber Travellers limited around 00: 10 hours at Kande Bridge  on Mongu- Lusaka Road.

The deceased has been identified as Nyambe Nyambe aged 35, of Kande area, Village Likoka of Chief Kandula in Mongu District.

The accident happened when the dirver of the bus, Evans Kafula aged 42 of House number 501 section 22 in Luansya’s Mpatamatu township hit the cyclist who was moving in the same direction as the bus whilst pushing a bycycle.

The body of the deceased is lying in Lewanika General Hospital mortuary while the driver is detained in Police custody Charged with Causing death by dangerous driving.

And on the Copperbelt, an unidentified man died on the spot after he was hit by a Nissan Hard Body registration number ABG 6791 along Kitwe Chingola Road in an accident which happened near Kitwe Zesco around 18 30 hours.

The accident happened when the pedestrian was crossing the road and was in the process hit by the motor vehicle which was driven by Stephen Kunda aged 44, of house number 94 Mukwa Natwange in Kitwe.